lectures and seminars

summer term 2018

Introduction to Brain Computer Interaction (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
Brain Computer Interaction or Brain-Computer-interfaces (BCI) have been a topic of intense research in neuroscience/neuroengineering for the last decades. Controlling a machine just via thoughts is mainly used in clinical applications to enable e.g. paralyzed people interaction and communication with the outer world. However, more and more consumer products found their way on the market recently, to provide applications not only for handicapped people. Current solutions make it possible to control robot arms, entire exoskeletons, wheelchairs or even cars to regain mobility. They are used for stroke rehabilitation, as communication tools (so called brain-typers) or to measure stress and focus in everyday life. No matter how far we have come, these solutions still lack the necessary usability due to intense training sessions and their accuracy/reliability. Machine learning techniques might solve these problems in the future. This seminar covers aspects of current challenges in Brain Computer Interaction and focuses on non-invasive EEG-based BCI techniques. Attendees will investigate a particular challenge in this field in groups of 4 based on scientific publications. We will provide a first collection of papers related to the chosen research topic. At the end of the seminar, you are supposed to provide a current state-of-the art concerning your topic as well as ideas for further research, to overcome existing problems in this field.

winter term 2016

Attentive User Interfaces (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
As the number of interactive systems around us rapidly increases, managing user attention has emerged as a critical challenge for next-generation human-computer interfaces. This research seminar will explore attentive user interfaces that continuously sense, analyse, and adapt to users’ visual attention. We start with a general introduction into the topic as well as an overview of the main research challenges that span computer vision, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The main part of the seminar will consist of lecture-style presentations prepared and given by the students on key topics, such computational modelling of visual attention, gaze estimation, eye movement analysis, gaze visualisation, as well as gaze-based human-computer and human-robot interaction. References as a starting point for more in-depth literature studies by the students will be provided. The seminar will also feature presentations by PhD students on selected research projects currently conducted in the group. Students interested in additional hands-on experience (not graded) can borrow a state-of-the-art head-mounted eye tracker for the duration of the seminar.

winter term 2015

Ringvorlesung: Perspektiven der Informatik (Lecture)
This lecture series provides first year students of Computer Science at Saarland University with a broad overview of various fields of Computer Science. We are contributing the lecture on Human-Computer-Interaction as well as Wearable and Ubiquitous Computing.

winter term 2014

Egocentric Computer Vision (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
This research seminar will explore the challenges of egocentric computer vision and wearable head-mounted vision devices, such as Google Glass. First, we start with a brief introduction and literature review on existing work in this area. The main part of the course consists of a project in which students will develop, implement and evaluate an example application. The organisers will assist participants in shaping and formulating project ideas, which will then be presented and discussed within the group. Based on the discussions and feedback these ideas will be prototyped and evaluated on datasets or in a user study, as appropriate. The seminar will conclude with a final presentation of the project outcomes and a project report.

summer term 2014

Multi-User Gaze-Based Interaction (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
Gaze-based interaction is commonly considered within a single user scenario. Many techniques emerged to combine people’s eye movements together with other input modalities to interact with each other or computing systems, such as interactive surfaces. In this seminar the focus is on the development of applications providing multi user gaze based interaction input. Teams of two persons will design and implement an interactive application. The software to use the eye trackers will be provided. Students are free to develop their own ideas, which will be only restricted to different categories provided by us. To get feedback project ideas and related work have to be presented to the group. Attendance during all meetings is mandatory.

winter term 2013

Mobile Eye Tracking meets Egocentric Computer Vision (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
This seminar will explore the challenges of the emerging technology of wearable eye tracking and egocentric computer vision devices, such as Google Glass. In the first part of the seminar the organisers will give a brief overview of the field and introduce key methods and algorithms. The second part will consist of a project in which students will develop, implement and evaluate an example application. The organisers will assist participants in shaping and formulating project ideas, which will then be presented and discussed within the group. Based on the discussions and feedback these ideas will be prototyped and evaluated on datasets or in a user study, as appropriate. The seminar will conclude with a final presentation of the project outcomes and a project report.

summer term 2013

Software Development in HCI (Research Seminar, 7 ECTS)
In this seminar small projects will be conducted following the principle of User Centered Design (UCD). The goal of this seminar is to design and implement example interactive systems and to conduct user studies by applying Human Computer Interaction (HCI) methods.